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  • WEEE Disposal:

    Providing a collection and recycling service for Clients.

  • Protecting the Environment:

    Managing Hazardous Wastes for Clients since 2005.

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    Providing Consultancy, mitigating risk to the Envionment, Improving CSR.

The History of the WEEE Directive and its Categories

History

 

In January 2003 the EU published the Waste Electronic and Electrical Equipment (WEEE) Directive. In December 2006 the directive was adopted by Parliament and then came into force in England and Wales (the UK) in 2007.

 

The Original Directive was significantly revised in 2012 to reflect failings that had been highlighted in the original directive. These were then adopted by the UK as the revised WEEE Directive (2013).

 

The goals of the legislation have not changed since inception and aim to reduce the amount of electrical waste going to landfill, and to encourage recycling and reuse. However, the revisions also aim to encourage re-use through repair and refurbishment and to reduce the volumes exported to developing countries.

 

A Producer Regulation:

 

The WEEE Directive is a Producer responsibility directive, whereby the manufacturer or retailer is required to cover part of the the cost of recycling the product at the end of its life.

 

The Producer/ Retailer is required to join a Producer Compliance Scheme and pay an annual cost to the scheme to cover the cost of recycling.

 

The Producer Compliance Scheme ensures the waste is recycled by an Approved Authorised Treatment Facility.

 

The application of the regulations do not absolve you of your responsibilities under existing Waste Management regulations and you are required to dispose of your wastes in accordance with current Waste Management regulations. 

 

The Categories of WEEE:

 

1) Large household appliances See more.

 
These Include:

 

  • Fridges*
  • Freezers*
  • Cookers**

 

Notes:

 

These “White Goods” are typically found in a household environment. The retailer should offer a take-back scheme, removing like-for-like items that are being replaced at the time of delivery.

 

Items delivered by the retailer fall under the packaging directive, which like the WEEE directive, requires the retailer to recover all packaging for recycling.

 

Household DCFs (Designated Collection facilities) are operated at HWRC (Household waste recycling centres) and should accept these items for recycling.

 

Many Local Authorities offer a “Bulky Waste” collection service for these items. However, the service typically incurs a charge.

 

*Absolute Hazardous

**May be Hazardous- risk of Asbestos in Older units

 

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2) Small household appliances See more.

 
These Include:

 

  • Microwaves
  • Hand-Held Electrical Appliances including food mixers, hair dryers, curling tongs, digital alarm clocks.

 

Notes:

 

These goods are typically purchased in store and the retailer has a responsibility to provide the consumer with an in-store take-back scheme for like-for-like items that are being replaced at the time of purchase.

 

Household DCFs (Designated Collection facilities) are operated at HWRC (Household waste recycling centres) and should accept these items for recycling.

 

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3) IT and telecommunications equipment See more.

 
These Include:

 

  • Computers
  • Laptops*
  • Mobile Phones*
  • Desk Phones (Excl VOIP systems)
  • Printers (excl Workgroup printers)

 

Notes:

 

The equipment is covered by in-store take-back by the retailer where like for like items are purchased. Household DCFs (Designated Collection facilities) are operated at HWRC (Household waste recycling centres) and should accept these items for recycling.

 

The Consumer should be aware that the disposal of waste IT equipment leaves the owner at risk of data or identity theft. All data MUST be destroyed prior to disposal.

 

*Absolute Hazardous

 

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4) Consumer equipment See more.

 
These Include:

 

  • Televisions*
  • Radios
  • Musical Instruments

 

Notes:

 

These goods are typically purchased in store and the retailer has a responsibility to provide the consumer with an in-store take-back scheme for like-for-like items that are being replaced at the time of purchase.

 

Household DCFs (Designated Collection facilities) are operated at HWRC (Household waste recycling centres) and should accept these items for recycling.

 

*Absolute Hazardous

 

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5) Lighting equipment See more.

 
These Include:

 

  • Fluorescent Lamps*
  • Non-Household Lighting

 

Notes:

 

Some of these goods are purchased in store by consumers and the retailer has a responsibility to provide the consumer with an in-store take-back scheme for like-for-like items that are being replaced at the time of purchase.

 

Businesses must arrange for alternative solutions to the disposal of lighting equipment. The retailer is under no obligation to accept like-for-like returns for recycling.

 

Businesses are not permitted to use HWRC facilities for their waste.

 

*Absolute Hazardous

 

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6) Electrical and electronic tools See more.

 
These Include:

 

  • Drills
  • Electrical Hand Tools
  • Welding Equipment
  • Electric Lawnmowers

 

Notes:

 

These goods are typically purchased in store and the retailer has a responsibility to provide the consumer with an in-store take-back scheme for like-for-like items that are being replaced at the time of purchase.

 

Household DCFs (Designated Collection facilities) are operated at HWRC (Household waste recycling centres) and should accept these items for recycling.

 

Businesses must arrange for alternative solutions to the disposal of Tools. The retailer is under no obligation to accept like-for-like returns for recycling.

 

Businesses are not permitted to use HWRC facilities for their waste.

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These regulations do NOT cover the disposal of Large scale plant and electrically operated machinery.

 

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7) Toys, leisure and sports equipment See more.

 
These Include:

 

  • Electric Train Sets
  • Slot Cars
  • Digital Devices
  • Heartrate/ health monitoring wrist bands

 

Notes:

 

These goods are typically purchased in store and the retailer has a responsibility to provide the consumer with an in-store take-back scheme for like-for-like items that are being replaced at the time of purchase.

 

Household DCFs (Designated Collection facilities) are operated at HWRC (Household waste recycling centres) and should accept these items for recycling.

 

Toys where the primary function is not that of an electrical/ electronic device, do not fall under the WEEE directive.

 

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8.) Medical devices (excepting implanted and infected products) See more.

 
These Include:

 

  • dialysis machines
  • ventilators

 

Notes:

 

Businesses must arrange for alternative solutions to the disposal of Medical equipment. The retailer is under no obligation to accept like-for-like returns for recycling.

 

Businesses are not permitted to use HWRC facilities for their waste.

 

Products that have been implanted into or used inside the Body are not permitted in this waste stream and must be treated as clinical waste

 

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9) Monitoring and control instruments See more.

 
These Include:

 

  • smoke detectors
  • Thermostats

 

Notes:

 

Businesses must arrange for alternative solutions to the disposal of Control equipment. The retailer is under no obligation to accept like-for-like returns for recycling.

 

Businesses are not permitted to use HWRC facilities for their waste.

 

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10) Automatic dispensers See more.

 
These Include:

 

  • Drinks Dispensers
  • Food Dispensers

 

Notes:

 

Note that Businesses are not permitted to use HWRC facilities for their waste.

 

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Note that: The WEEE Regulations apply to finished products. Components, sub-assemblies, consumables and spares are usually exempt.

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